Unplugged

Several years ago, MTV experimented with inviting artists to appear “unplugged.” No amps, no distortion, no giant productions … all trappings were set aside in favor of simplicity. People were struck by the beauty of talent.

I just went unplugged for almost a month. I purposely disconnected my email, set away messages on my phone and broke my computer ties with the work world. It was beautiful. The electronic noise in my life faded away.

The electronic noise was replaced by other noises. Draining electronic noise gave way to rejuvenating conversations, relaxed schedules and laughter. The click of keyboards gone, my hands were freed for other things; human touch, board games and play.

Anxiety and racing heartbeats were put to death by afternoon naps. Wrestless nights were gone by day four and replaced by deep, renewing sleep.

I am a techie. I love gadgets. But I have gradually become a slave to electronic devices. Initially, they kept me connected to people. I love people. But somehow, these little connecting devices became tools of details and deadlines and grew into barriers that kept me from people. Instead of helping me in building relationships, these devices have become little more than pipelines for additional demands, administration and scheduling.

My unplugged experiment brought a major unexpected bonus. I found myself having running conversations with God. He surprised me by showing up beside me on amusement park benches in Orlando. I felt His arm around me while I walked around the pool and I shared numerous moments with Him where I sensed Him saying, “Breath deep, enjoy, look what I have given you.”

Sabbath rest.

Unplug, my friend. Please don’t answer my call. Feel free not to respond to my email immediately. Set aside times to unplug and sense God hanging with you.

About Scott Linscott

Living life to the fullest, walking in the dust of my Rabbi, creating art through photography and written word, speaking words of hope and encouragement at conferences, workshops, church and civic gatherings.
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2 Responses to Unplugged

  1. I have recently begun to unplug. I am also a major techie. Three digital cameras and a D-SLR, two flat panels, video camera with the works, two GPS systems, updated iPhone, three computers, and absolutely NO PEACE! I felt like I was attached to an electronic leash everywhere that I went! I found that all of these items were a major distraction. It was no wonder that I had developed an obsessive compulsive shopping disorder. I didn’t know how to hold or touch anything or appreciate it for more than two seconds. I had found clothes in my four closets that had tags on them from years ago.

    As I have begun to unplug, I find myself in my study for hours a day, teaching myself Mandarin Chinese. No blaring television in the background, just worship music from my iTunes library. The cable tv (and I had every channel available) has been turned off, and it doesn’t even bother me that there is a flat panel in my bedroom that I can’t or probably won’t ever use again. I sleep so much better at night and my focus has improved ten-fold. I don’t worry about grabbing a laptop when I walk out of the house and if I do, it is for a good reason. I feel very free.

    This was what life was like when I was a teenager. I’ll be 33 this weekend. Aside from the conveniences of electronics, unplugging and moving away from always having one of them in my hand at all times, has been a major blessing!

  2. Grammy says:

    when we first arrived in Costa Rica we had no cell phones. It was unnerving at first like withdrawl. After a while I liked the quietness and lack of urgency( maybe because the ring was so obnoxious you had to answere it right away). We tell each other when we expect to return and alow a 2 hour grace period before worrying. When we were just in the states for a few weeks it was the cell phones that hit our ears not just the rings but the open conversations all about us. I don’t miss cell phones anymore now we have returned.

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